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Management article
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Reference no. CMR376
Authors: David Aaker
Published by: University of California, Berkeley
Published in: "California Management Review", 2007

Abstract

A brand strategy can be critical to the success of an innovation, particularly in the long term. There are times when a firm literally needs to brand an innovation or lose it. Without a successful branding strategy, an innovation can be short-lived - diffusing into a confused marketplace with its impact dissipated - or become another forgotten internal initiative. In such cases, branding can make all the difference. Branding, it should be emphasized, does not mean simply putting a name and logo on an innovation. Rather, it means making the brand an integral part of a coherent strategy, supported by actively managed and adequately funded brand-building programs. However, not all innovations merit such a program and over-branding can pose business risks.

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Abstract

A brand strategy can be critical to the success of an innovation, particularly in the long term. There are times when a firm literally needs to brand an innovation or lose it. Without a successful branding strategy, an innovation can be short-lived - diffusing into a confused marketplace with its impact dissipated - or become another forgotten internal initiative. In such cases, branding can make all the difference. Branding, it should be emphasized, does not mean simply putting a name and logo on an innovation. Rather, it means making the brand an integral part of a coherent strategy, supported by actively managed and adequately funded brand-building programs. However, not all innovations merit such a program and over-branding can pose business risks.

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