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Case from journal
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Reference no. NAC2003
Published by: NACRA - North American Case Research Association
Published in: "The Case Research Journal", 2000
Length: 10 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

The American Basketball League (ABL), a newly formed women's professional basketball league, was at a critical juncture. Although the ABL recently completed a successful inaugural season, the competitive landscape had changed dramatically with the entrance of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The WNBA's parent organization, the NBA, was both experienced and powerful. The independent ABL must not only consider its own options, but it also must determine how to deal with the better-funded WNBA. Gary Cavalli, the Chief Executive Officer of the ABL, was the man at the crux of this difficult situation. Each league possessed different strengths and weaknesses as they vied for sponsors, players, and television contracts. To complicate matters further, this competitive battle was being fought in an industry that was still developing and not yet well defined. Decisions made would determine the future of the upstart ABL, as well as that of the women's professional basketball industry.

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Abstract

The American Basketball League (ABL), a newly formed women's professional basketball league, was at a critical juncture. Although the ABL recently completed a successful inaugural season, the competitive landscape had changed dramatically with the entrance of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The WNBA's parent organization, the NBA, was both experienced and powerful. The independent ABL must not only consider its own options, but it also must determine how to deal with the better-funded WNBA. Gary Cavalli, the Chief Executive Officer of the ABL, was the man at the crux of this difficult situation. Each league possessed different strengths and weaknesses as they vied for sponsors, players, and television contracts. To complicate matters further, this competitive battle was being fought in an industry that was still developing and not yet well defined. Decisions made would determine the future of the upstart ABL, as well as that of the women's professional basketball industry.

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