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Management article
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Reference no. U0803D
Authors: Roly Grimshaw
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Update", 2008

Abstract

As a senior manager, you live in a world of numbers and understand them well. But how good are you at communicating the meaning of those numbers to others? This article by Roly Grimshaw, a London-based communications consultant, helps you deliver clear, focused presentations that convey your key points without boring or confusing your listeners with a blizzard of data. To make your numbers come alive, Grimshaw suggests following four steps: Identify the key points you want to make, with your numbers as evidence. Be selective in deciding which numbers are the most compelling to your audience. Make your overall message consistent, but change your supporting data and illustrations to suit your listeners. And follow up by reinforcing your key points in subsequent presentations. This article is a slightly abridged version of an article entitled 'Communication by the Numbers' that appeared in the July 2005 issue of The Harvard Management Communication Letter.

About

Abstract

As a senior manager, you live in a world of numbers and understand them well. But how good are you at communicating the meaning of those numbers to others? This article by Roly Grimshaw, a London-based communications consultant, helps you deliver clear, focused presentations that convey your key points without boring or confusing your listeners with a blizzard of data. To make your numbers come alive, Grimshaw suggests following four steps: Identify the key points you want to make, with your numbers as evidence. Be selective in deciding which numbers are the most compelling to your audience. Make your overall message consistent, but change your supporting data and illustrations to suit your listeners. And follow up by reinforcing your key points in subsequent presentations. This article is a slightly abridged version of an article entitled 'Communication by the Numbers' that appeared in the July 2005 issue of The Harvard Management Communication Letter.

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