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Management article
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Reference no. ICR071A
Published by: International Commerce Institute
Published in: "International Commerce Review", 2007

Abstract

The packaged goods industry faces a ''huge agenda for change'', warns a specially commissioned GCI report on the supply chains of the future. A move from ''push'' to ''pull'' supply chains, intensifying two way communication with shoppers, and much greater information sharing are just a few of the transformational trends to sweep the packaged goods industry over the next ten years. The rapid growth of China, India and other rapidly developing economies will tilt the world''s economic balance, creating huge new opportunities for manufacturers and retailers. At the same time, however, climate change and other environmental concerns will place intense pressure on companies to rethink every step of their production and distribution processes from initial energy inputs to waste disposal. New technologies will make virtual reality a common day-to-day experience; biometry will be a key to security and authorisation, while machine-to-machine communication (via mobile logistics, RFID and telematics) will open up new opportunities for supply chain flexibility and efficiency. Better use of consumer data will be critical. Together, such developments will change not only what consumers shop for, but how they shop and from whom they buy. Put together, such trends don''t just mean more of the same. They point to a rapid evolution of consumer expectations and behaviours – and business models.

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Abstract

The packaged goods industry faces a ''huge agenda for change'', warns a specially commissioned GCI report on the supply chains of the future. A move from ''push'' to ''pull'' supply chains, intensifying two way communication with shoppers, and much greater information sharing are just a few of the transformational trends to sweep the packaged goods industry over the next ten years. The rapid growth of China, India and other rapidly developing economies will tilt the world''s economic balance, creating huge new opportunities for manufacturers and retailers. At the same time, however, climate change and other environmental concerns will place intense pressure on companies to rethink every step of their production and distribution processes from initial energy inputs to waste disposal. New technologies will make virtual reality a common day-to-day experience; biometry will be a key to security and authorisation, while machine-to-machine communication (via mobile logistics, RFID and telematics) will open up new opportunities for supply chain flexibility and efficiency. Better use of consumer data will be critical. Together, such developments will change not only what consumers shop for, but how they shop and from whom they buy. Put together, such trends don''t just mean more of the same. They point to a rapid evolution of consumer expectations and behaviours – and business models.

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