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Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1978
Length: 18 pages
Notes: For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

The congressional debate leading up to passage of the Education Amendments of 1972 raised fundamental issues concerning federal policy toward higher education. Should the federal government assist students or institutions? Should aid be available only to the poor or to all who face the pinch of the rising costs of a college education? How much student aid should be in the form of grants and how much in the form of loans? After reviewing the history of federal aid to higher education and outlining the programs that were up for renewal or amendment, this case examines the issues confronting policymakers as they neared a decision on the role of federal aid to higher education. The sequel traces developments from 1972 to 1977 and concludes with a discussion of then-current proposals for tuition tax credits and other middle-income assistance plans.

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Abstract

The congressional debate leading up to passage of the Education Amendments of 1972 raised fundamental issues concerning federal policy toward higher education. Should the federal government assist students or institutions? Should aid be available only to the poor or to all who face the pinch of the rising costs of a college education? How much student aid should be in the form of grants and how much in the form of loans? After reviewing the history of federal aid to higher education and outlining the programs that were up for renewal or amendment, this case examines the issues confronting policymakers as they neared a decision on the role of federal aid to higher education. The sequel traces developments from 1972 to 1977 and concludes with a discussion of then-current proposals for tuition tax credits and other middle-income assistance plans.

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