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Compact case
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Authors: Sally Gunz (University of Waterloo); Benson Honig (Wilfrid Laurier University); John McCutcheon (Wilfrid Laurier University)
Published in: 2008

Abstract

The case centres on the business plans of Anthony Padua, a severely disabled entrepreneur. Anthony is resident in Canada but, for purposes of the use of this case, could equally well be a resident of the US. Indeed, in the facts of the case he is contemplating shifting his business to the US if it would overcome some of the difficulties he believes he faces. He is typical of most persons at this stage of the planning process: he has great vision, enormous enthusiasm, unbounded faith in the viability of his idea, limited financial backing, and limited managerial experience. Compounding the difficulties here are his extraordinary physical limitations that we know slow his ability to deliver and are also likely to significantly sap his energy. This case is written for students in business law, general business / strategy, international business or entrepreneurship courses. It addresses issues of international application of law and, in particular in the context of small, start-up businesses. It incorporates issues of the law for the disabled, basic contract law, intellectual property, and product liability, all in the context of an Internet business. Ancillary issues include obligations of airline carriers and the law of first nations in Canada. International issues focus primarily on the laws of Canada, the United States and the EC Law relating to Canadian First Nations may or may not be considered ''international'' depending on the perspective of the user. As with any business case, instructors may choose to focus on some or all of the relevant issues, depending upon the focus of the class. Of over-riding importance will be the students'' ability to consider legal issues from the perspective of the particular business venture. As is often the case for small businesses, commercial concerns relating to the affordability and practicality of enforcing legal rights are often as important or more important as the law itself. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.
Location:
Size:
Start-up organisation
Other setting(s):
2006

About

Abstract

The case centres on the business plans of Anthony Padua, a severely disabled entrepreneur. Anthony is resident in Canada but, for purposes of the use of this case, could equally well be a resident of the US. Indeed, in the facts of the case he is contemplating shifting his business to the US if it would overcome some of the difficulties he believes he faces. He is typical of most persons at this stage of the planning process: he has great vision, enormous enthusiasm, unbounded faith in the viability of his idea, limited financial backing, and limited managerial experience. Compounding the difficulties here are his extraordinary physical limitations that we know slow his ability to deliver and are also likely to significantly sap his energy. This case is written for students in business law, general business / strategy, international business or entrepreneurship courses. It addresses issues of international application of law and, in particular in the context of small, start-up businesses. It incorporates issues of the law for the disabled, basic contract law, intellectual property, and product liability, all in the context of an Internet business. Ancillary issues include obligations of airline carriers and the law of first nations in Canada. International issues focus primarily on the laws of Canada, the United States and the EC Law relating to Canadian First Nations may or may not be considered ''international'' depending on the perspective of the user. As with any business case, instructors may choose to focus on some or all of the relevant issues, depending upon the focus of the class. Of over-riding importance will be the students'' ability to consider legal issues from the perspective of the particular business venture. As is often the case for small businesses, commercial concerns relating to the affordability and practicality of enforcing legal rights are often as important or more important as the law itself. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.

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Location:
Size:
Start-up organisation
Other setting(s):
2006

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