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Abstract

This case is aimed at analysing the factors that contributed to the rise of Asian countries, South Asia in particular, as favoured health care destinations. It also helps in discussing the emergence of new business models, combining all the aspects which will appeal better to medical tourists. This case also looks into the effect of the changing dynamics of the health care industry on developed economies. The global health care industry is becoming more competitive in the wake of a number of uninsured and underinsured patients, from developed countries like the US, UK and other European countries, travelling to the developing nations seeking high quality medical treatment at affordable costs. A patient undergoing the recuperation process, or associates of the patients travelling across continents along with the patient, obviously wish to visit key tourist places in the new region - while the patient is undergoing treatment or recuperating. Ever enthusiastic entrepreneurs are foreseeing promising prospects in facilitating conveyance, traditional food, lodging, tourism and entertainment along with aftercare for the patients from abroad. All these factors are popularising the term, 'Medical Tourism'. Developing nations in Asia like Thailand and India are offering quality health care by providing high quality equipment and treatment at comparatively low prices. Apart from the resources necessary for highly specialised treatment procedures like coronary artery bypass surgery, Asian countries are also blessed with a rich medical heritage offering alternative treatments like yoga, acupuncture and herbal treatments to medical tourists. In addition, scenic beauty and historical importance of Asian countries make them an ideal destination for patients and their associates.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2009

About

Abstract

This case is aimed at analysing the factors that contributed to the rise of Asian countries, South Asia in particular, as favoured health care destinations. It also helps in discussing the emergence of new business models, combining all the aspects which will appeal better to medical tourists. This case also looks into the effect of the changing dynamics of the health care industry on developed economies. The global health care industry is becoming more competitive in the wake of a number of uninsured and underinsured patients, from developed countries like the US, UK and other European countries, travelling to the developing nations seeking high quality medical treatment at affordable costs. A patient undergoing the recuperation process, or associates of the patients travelling across continents along with the patient, obviously wish to visit key tourist places in the new region - while the patient is undergoing treatment or recuperating. Ever enthusiastic entrepreneurs are foreseeing promising prospects in facilitating conveyance, traditional food, lodging, tourism and entertainment along with aftercare for the patients from abroad. All these factors are popularising the term, 'Medical Tourism'. Developing nations in Asia like Thailand and India are offering quality health care by providing high quality equipment and treatment at comparatively low prices. Apart from the resources necessary for highly specialised treatment procedures like coronary artery bypass surgery, Asian countries are also blessed with a rich medical heritage offering alternative treatments like yoga, acupuncture and herbal treatments to medical tourists. In addition, scenic beauty and historical importance of Asian countries make them an ideal destination for patients and their associates.

Settings

Location:
Other setting(s):
2009

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