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Case
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Reference no. 9-510-039
Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 2019
Version: 8 May 2019
Revision date: 14-Dec-2020
Length: 18 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

It's 2009 and Paul Williamson, Head of Ticketing, must finalize ticket prices for the 2012 London Olympic Games. Yet, there are many criteria to consider. First, given the importance of ticketing to the Games' bottom line, he has a strong incentive to maximize revenues. Second, because the entire world will be watching, he wants to maximize attendance - not just at the Opening Ceremony and swimming finals, which are easy sells, but also at events such as handball and table tennis, which are not. Third, he wants to fill seats with the right people - knowledgeable fans who add to the energy and atmosphere of the event. Finally, tickets had to be accessible not only to the world's elite but also to average Londoners, many of whom lived around the corner from the Olympic Park.
Location:
Size:
USD2 billion (one time event), 200 employees
Other setting(s):
2009-2012

About

Abstract

It's 2009 and Paul Williamson, Head of Ticketing, must finalize ticket prices for the 2012 London Olympic Games. Yet, there are many criteria to consider. First, given the importance of ticketing to the Games' bottom line, he has a strong incentive to maximize revenues. Second, because the entire world will be watching, he wants to maximize attendance - not just at the Opening Ceremony and swimming finals, which are easy sells, but also at events such as handball and table tennis, which are not. Third, he wants to fill seats with the right people - knowledgeable fans who add to the energy and atmosphere of the event. Finally, tickets had to be accessible not only to the world's elite but also to average Londoners, many of whom lived around the corner from the Olympic Park.

Settings

Location:
Size:
USD2 billion (one time event), 200 employees
Other setting(s):
2009-2012

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