Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Case
-
Reference no. M323A
Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Stanford Business School
Originally published in: 2009
Version: 23 August 2009
Length: 19 pages
Data source: Field research
Notes: This item is part of a free case collection. For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

Stories are all around us. Stories move us, make us feel alive, inspire us to be more than we would be otherwise. Our appetite for stories is a reflection of the basic human need to understand patterns of life - not merely as an intellectual exercise but as a personal, emotional experience. Learning how to tell a story cannot guarantee the reaching of truth, but it can help you connect with your audience, move your audience, and make your material more memorable. Traditionally, business people persuade using only the left side of the brain, or reason. However, persuasion occurs, just as much (if not more) through emotion. By developing the right side of the brain, engagement can be better built through uniting an idea with an emotion. And the best way to do this is by telling a compelling story. This case is part of the Stanford Graduate School of Business free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/stanfordfreecases for more information on the collection).

About

Abstract

Stories are all around us. Stories move us, make us feel alive, inspire us to be more than we would be otherwise. Our appetite for stories is a reflection of the basic human need to understand patterns of life - not merely as an intellectual exercise but as a personal, emotional experience. Learning how to tell a story cannot guarantee the reaching of truth, but it can help you connect with your audience, move your audience, and make your material more memorable. Traditionally, business people persuade using only the left side of the brain, or reason. However, persuasion occurs, just as much (if not more) through emotion. By developing the right side of the brain, engagement can be better built through uniting an idea with an emotion. And the best way to do this is by telling a compelling story. This case is part of the Stanford Graduate School of Business free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/stanfordfreecases for more information on the collection).

Related