Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Book chapter
-
Reference no. MHE0002BC
Authors: Samuel Cameron
Chapter from: "Econometrics"
Published by: McGraw Hill Education
Published in: 2005

Abstract

Chapter 2. The book aims to introduce students with little or no previous experience in econometrics to this important discipline. This text focuses on explaining why econometrics exists and how it can be used in everyday life. This text adopts a strong student-focused approach to the discipline. In doing so, it aims to address fundamental issues in econometrics in an accessible manner for students, who are often put off by the difficult nature of the subject. The learning objectives of this chapter are: (1) understand the different sources of data (cross-section, time-series and panel); (2) understand the different levels of measurement (categorical, ordinal and ratio); (3) be aware of the concept of probability and its use in econometrics; (4) be familiar with the important probability distributions, especially the normal; (5) know how to write down and carry out hypothesis tests; and (6) understand the concepts of covariance and correlation.

About

Abstract

Chapter 2. The book aims to introduce students with little or no previous experience in econometrics to this important discipline. This text focuses on explaining why econometrics exists and how it can be used in everyday life. This text adopts a strong student-focused approach to the discipline. In doing so, it aims to address fundamental issues in econometrics in an accessible manner for students, who are often put off by the difficult nature of the subject. The learning objectives of this chapter are: (1) understand the different sources of data (cross-section, time-series and panel); (2) understand the different levels of measurement (categorical, ordinal and ratio); (3) be aware of the concept of probability and its use in econometrics; (4) be familiar with the important probability distributions, especially the normal; (5) know how to write down and carry out hypothesis tests; and (6) understand the concepts of covariance and correlation.

Related