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Abstract

This case is meant for discussing the evolution of entrepreneurship in India and the emergence and growth of the ''New Age Indian Entrepreneur''. Since time immemorial, the Indian business segment has been dominated by family-run businesses, with most of them hailing from traditional, money-lending or trading communities, known for their sharp business acumen. Moreover, entrepreneurship in the Indian scenario has long been associated with the ''Tatas'', ''Birlas'' or Ambanis''. However, with many first-generation entrepreneurs bombarding the Indian business sector in recent years, this trend has taken a back seat. Although these legendary business houses have played a major role in the country''s business scenario, the majority of Indian start-ups in the recent past are the brainchild of first-generation, middle-class entrepreneurs. Dictating professions by means of caste and social strata has become a matter of the past. Economic reforms and liberalisation have rekindled the latent entrepreneurial streak of the Indian people, making entrepreneurship a desired choice of career. Further, easy access to resources and growing social acceptance has encouraged many Indians to jump on to the entrepreneurship bandwagon. Driven by the aim of creating ventures based on feasible business models and backed by innovative ideas, these new entrepreneurs are not leaving any stone unturned. Nevertheless, this sudden splurge in entrepreneurship has also given rise to many apprehensions. Are these entrepreneurs dedicated towards building world-class companies which shall weave long-term success stories? How many of these entrepreneurs will be able to make a mark like the legendary business firms of the Tatas and Birlas? This case can be used to: (1) trace the history of entrepreneurship in India and to compare entrepreneurship in India with that of other countries (such as Japan and Finland); (2) compare and contrast the new age Indian entrepreneurs with those of the past; (3) identify and discuss the challenges being faced by the new age Indian entrepreneurs; and (4) debate if there is an equivalent of level 5 leadership in entrepreneurship.
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2009

About

Abstract

This case is meant for discussing the evolution of entrepreneurship in India and the emergence and growth of the ''New Age Indian Entrepreneur''. Since time immemorial, the Indian business segment has been dominated by family-run businesses, with most of them hailing from traditional, money-lending or trading communities, known for their sharp business acumen. Moreover, entrepreneurship in the Indian scenario has long been associated with the ''Tatas'', ''Birlas'' or Ambanis''. However, with many first-generation entrepreneurs bombarding the Indian business sector in recent years, this trend has taken a back seat. Although these legendary business houses have played a major role in the country''s business scenario, the majority of Indian start-ups in the recent past are the brainchild of first-generation, middle-class entrepreneurs. Dictating professions by means of caste and social strata has become a matter of the past. Economic reforms and liberalisation have rekindled the latent entrepreneurial streak of the Indian people, making entrepreneurship a desired choice of career. Further, easy access to resources and growing social acceptance has encouraged many Indians to jump on to the entrepreneurship bandwagon. Driven by the aim of creating ventures based on feasible business models and backed by innovative ideas, these new entrepreneurs are not leaving any stone unturned. Nevertheless, this sudden splurge in entrepreneurship has also given rise to many apprehensions. Are these entrepreneurs dedicated towards building world-class companies which shall weave long-term success stories? How many of these entrepreneurs will be able to make a mark like the legendary business firms of the Tatas and Birlas? This case can be used to: (1) trace the history of entrepreneurship in India and to compare entrepreneurship in India with that of other countries (such as Japan and Finland); (2) compare and contrast the new age Indian entrepreneurs with those of the past; (3) identify and discuss the challenges being faced by the new age Indian entrepreneurs; and (4) debate if there is an equivalent of level 5 leadership in entrepreneurship.

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Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2009

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