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Abstract

This case examines the business model of Living Goods, the US-based non-profit organisation. Started by Chris Slaughter, Living Goods' first venture was in Uganda, where it partnered with a microfinance organisation BRAC (building resources across communities) to provide basic health care services to the poor, in a sustainable manner. Living Goods selected women from BRAC's microfinance programmes to appoint them as CHPs (community health promoters). They were given a small loan from BRAC to procure essential medicines and other products. Living Goods trained and helped CHPs in selling medicines for a small profit. This model addressed several issues like non-availability of health care, spurious and high costs of medicines and lost productivity. At the same time, it helped CHPs engage in income generating activities. To make the model viable, Living Goods encouraged CHPs to sell other products like soap, skin lotion and shampoo, etc. Living Goods also distributed fuel efficient stoves, solar lanterns and other innovative products through the CHPs.

Teaching and learning

This item is suitable for postgraduate courses.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
Very small
Other setting(s):
2007-2009

About

Abstract

This case examines the business model of Living Goods, the US-based non-profit organisation. Started by Chris Slaughter, Living Goods' first venture was in Uganda, where it partnered with a microfinance organisation BRAC (building resources across communities) to provide basic health care services to the poor, in a sustainable manner. Living Goods selected women from BRAC's microfinance programmes to appoint them as CHPs (community health promoters). They were given a small loan from BRAC to procure essential medicines and other products. Living Goods trained and helped CHPs in selling medicines for a small profit. This model addressed several issues like non-availability of health care, spurious and high costs of medicines and lost productivity. At the same time, it helped CHPs engage in income generating activities. To make the model viable, Living Goods encouraged CHPs to sell other products like soap, skin lotion and shampoo, etc. Living Goods also distributed fuel efficient stoves, solar lanterns and other innovative products through the CHPs.

Teaching and learning

This item is suitable for postgraduate courses.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
Very small
Other setting(s):
2007-2009

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