Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Book chapter
-
Reference no. MHE0059BC
Chapter from: "Financial Accounting Theory"
Published by: McGraw Hill Education
Published in: 2006

Abstract

Chapter 2. Written for the senior undergraduate accounting and postgraduate student, Financial Accounting Theory retains the same basic strengths that made its predecessor a market leader. It has a writing style that is easy to read and understand, includes critical evaluation and balanced discussion of different theories of accounting that will spark student interest. The book also develops analytical reasoning by challenging students to think about accounting issues at hand, and formulate opinions. The learning objectives of this chapter are to: (1) have a broad understanding of the history of the accounting profession and of accounting regulation; (2) be aware of some of the arguments for and against the existence of accounting regulation; (3) be aware of some of the theoretical perspectives used to explain the existence of regulation; (4) be aware of how and why various groups within society try to influence the accounting standard-setting process; (5) acknowledge that many accounting decisions are based on professional opinions and have an awareness of some of the theories used to explain what influences the accountant to choose one accounting method in preference to another; and (6) be aware of some of the arguments advanced to support a view that the accountant can be considered to be a powerful member of society.

About

Abstract

Chapter 2. Written for the senior undergraduate accounting and postgraduate student, Financial Accounting Theory retains the same basic strengths that made its predecessor a market leader. It has a writing style that is easy to read and understand, includes critical evaluation and balanced discussion of different theories of accounting that will spark student interest. The book also develops analytical reasoning by challenging students to think about accounting issues at hand, and formulate opinions. The learning objectives of this chapter are to: (1) have a broad understanding of the history of the accounting profession and of accounting regulation; (2) be aware of some of the arguments for and against the existence of accounting regulation; (3) be aware of some of the theoretical perspectives used to explain the existence of regulation; (4) be aware of how and why various groups within society try to influence the accounting standard-setting process; (5) acknowledge that many accounting decisions are based on professional opinions and have an awareness of some of the theories used to explain what influences the accountant to choose one accounting method in preference to another; and (6) be aware of some of the arguments advanced to support a view that the accountant can be considered to be a powerful member of society.

Related