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Book chapter
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Reference no. MHE0171BC
Chapter from: "Understanding Employment Relations"
Published by: McGraw Hill Education
Published in: 2007

Abstract

Chapter 7. This book deals with employment relations in Great Britain. It has been written to make it suitable for students and lecturers of employment relations, personnel management and human resource management, and in particular, for students with no prior exposure to this subject. However, it also gives access to some of the more advanced knowledge in the area, which makes it of use to those who wish to commence studying the subject at a higher level. More specifically, the book is directed at final year undergraduate and postgraduate students taking these subjects as part of a first degree, diploma or masters degree. The book has also been written for use on programmes that are recognised as meeting the professional standards for employee relations as set out by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). Each chapter contains a full explanation of the concepts and theories it contains, together with associated exercises and/or case studies that can be used to apply the material. A small number of Pause for Reflection exercises are included in each chapter. These are very short exercises that confront the reader with questions that encourage the application of concepts and theories covered in the text, but in a way that prompts the person to draw on his or her own learning and experiences. Part 3, Interpersonal processes in employment relations, contains two chapters which deal with what could most conveniently be described as interpersonal process. These are: discipline and grievance (chapter 6); and dismissal and redundancy (chapter 7). It also draws attention to the idea that the way in which any of these processes is conducted is strongly connected to other processes and outcomes in employment relations. The learning objectives of this chapter are to: (1) define dismissal; (2) distinguish between fair, wrongful and unfair dismissal; (3) define redundancy; (4) distinguish between a redundancy policy and a redundancy procedure; (5) explain the statutory requirements for consultation with employees (or their representatives) about potential redundancies; and (6) outline the main phases and desirable features of a comprehensive redundancy procedure.

About

Abstract

Chapter 7. This book deals with employment relations in Great Britain. It has been written to make it suitable for students and lecturers of employment relations, personnel management and human resource management, and in particular, for students with no prior exposure to this subject. However, it also gives access to some of the more advanced knowledge in the area, which makes it of use to those who wish to commence studying the subject at a higher level. More specifically, the book is directed at final year undergraduate and postgraduate students taking these subjects as part of a first degree, diploma or masters degree. The book has also been written for use on programmes that are recognised as meeting the professional standards for employee relations as set out by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). Each chapter contains a full explanation of the concepts and theories it contains, together with associated exercises and/or case studies that can be used to apply the material. A small number of Pause for Reflection exercises are included in each chapter. These are very short exercises that confront the reader with questions that encourage the application of concepts and theories covered in the text, but in a way that prompts the person to draw on his or her own learning and experiences. Part 3, Interpersonal processes in employment relations, contains two chapters which deal with what could most conveniently be described as interpersonal process. These are: discipline and grievance (chapter 6); and dismissal and redundancy (chapter 7). It also draws attention to the idea that the way in which any of these processes is conducted is strongly connected to other processes and outcomes in employment relations. The learning objectives of this chapter are to: (1) define dismissal; (2) distinguish between fair, wrongful and unfair dismissal; (3) define redundancy; (4) distinguish between a redundancy policy and a redundancy procedure; (5) explain the statutory requirements for consultation with employees (or their representatives) about potential redundancies; and (6) outline the main phases and desirable features of a comprehensive redundancy procedure.

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