Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Chapter from: "The European Union: Economics, Policies and History"
Published by: McGraw Hill Education
Published in: 2009

Abstract

Chapter 1. Of the many experts working on East-West studies, few predicted the collapse of Communism in 1989. Right from the start of transition the Central and Eastern European countries wanted to join the European integration process. At first the European Community seemed rather unprepared and overwhelmed at the prospect, but after a long and difficult process of preparation, between 2004 and 2007 much of Europe was again ''reunified''. In 2007 there were celebrations of fifty years of European integration and under the then German Presidency of the European Union (EU), Angela Merkel singled out environmental policy as a way of re-launching the integration process, announcing that the EU was at the vanguard of the battle against climate change. In recent years increased priority has also been given to increasing competitiveness, improving ''employability'' and encouraging the adaptability of businesses in the EU. European integration has a strong political impetus, but the method of implementation has been primarily economic. Numerous studies show that the Single Market Programme introduced from 1985, and bolstered in many member states by the euro, has fostered trade and other closer economic ties between countries. This book is aimed mainly at students of economics, European studies, business, political science and international relations. Though the approach is grounded in economics, the aim is to provide a multidisciplinary account of EU integration. The debate about whether the EU is primarily an economic or political entity is of long standing, but the view here is that in order to understand the process of integration a combination of economics, politics and history is necessary. The textbook is intended to have a strong policy orientation. Because each chapter has been written so that it can stand independently, the aim is also to provide a text that can be consulted by researchers or policy makers. For this purpose each chapter sets out references for further reading and relevant websites. By the end of this chapter you should be able to understand: (1) the difference between the terms European Economic Community, European Community and European Union; (2) how the membership of the European Union has changed over the years; (3) what we mean by integration, and its various stages; (4) what is the acquis communautaire; (5) what we mean by the term subsidiarity; and (6) the importance of the EU in the world economy.

About

Abstract

Chapter 1. Of the many experts working on East-West studies, few predicted the collapse of Communism in 1989. Right from the start of transition the Central and Eastern European countries wanted to join the European integration process. At first the European Community seemed rather unprepared and overwhelmed at the prospect, but after a long and difficult process of preparation, between 2004 and 2007 much of Europe was again ''reunified''. In 2007 there were celebrations of fifty years of European integration and under the then German Presidency of the European Union (EU), Angela Merkel singled out environmental policy as a way of re-launching the integration process, announcing that the EU was at the vanguard of the battle against climate change. In recent years increased priority has also been given to increasing competitiveness, improving ''employability'' and encouraging the adaptability of businesses in the EU. European integration has a strong political impetus, but the method of implementation has been primarily economic. Numerous studies show that the Single Market Programme introduced from 1985, and bolstered in many member states by the euro, has fostered trade and other closer economic ties between countries. This book is aimed mainly at students of economics, European studies, business, political science and international relations. Though the approach is grounded in economics, the aim is to provide a multidisciplinary account of EU integration. The debate about whether the EU is primarily an economic or political entity is of long standing, but the view here is that in order to understand the process of integration a combination of economics, politics and history is necessary. The textbook is intended to have a strong policy orientation. Because each chapter has been written so that it can stand independently, the aim is also to provide a text that can be consulted by researchers or policy makers. For this purpose each chapter sets out references for further reading and relevant websites. By the end of this chapter you should be able to understand: (1) the difference between the terms European Economic Community, European Community and European Union; (2) how the membership of the European Union has changed over the years; (3) what we mean by integration, and its various stages; (4) what is the acquis communautaire; (5) what we mean by the term subsidiarity; and (6) the importance of the EU in the world economy.

Related