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Authors: Michael A Hogg
Chapter from: "Crossing the Divide: Intergroup Leadership in a World of Difference"
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: 2009

Abstract

Leaders almost always must provide leadership for a constituency that encompasses not merely diverse individuals but also diverse groups that in many cases simply do not get along. More often than not, the great challenge of leadership is in being an effective intergroup leader. Another, often underappreciated feature of effective leadership is the ability to provide a constituency with a shared identity that embodies a single vision and common set of values, attitudes, goals, and practices. This chapter explores the dynamics of intergroup leadership from the perspective of social identity theory, a social psychology theory that explores the psychological relationships between self-conception and the behavior of people within and between groups. Specifically, the author looks at how leaders who are considered by a group's members to best embody the group's defining attributes can be most effective. This chapter is excerpted from ‘Crossing the Divide: Intergroup Leadership in a World of Difference'.

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Abstract

Leaders almost always must provide leadership for a constituency that encompasses not merely diverse individuals but also diverse groups that in many cases simply do not get along. More often than not, the great challenge of leadership is in being an effective intergroup leader. Another, often underappreciated feature of effective leadership is the ability to provide a constituency with a shared identity that embodies a single vision and common set of values, attitudes, goals, and practices. This chapter explores the dynamics of intergroup leadership from the perspective of social identity theory, a social psychology theory that explores the psychological relationships between self-conception and the behavior of people within and between groups. Specifically, the author looks at how leaders who are considered by a group's members to best embody the group's defining attributes can be most effective. This chapter is excerpted from ‘Crossing the Divide: Intergroup Leadership in a World of Difference'.

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