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Abstract

Chapter 22. This chapter draws on all of the others in the book and illustrates the holistic nature of human resource management (HRM), showing how all aspects of domestic HRM are equally applicable when managing an internationally mobile workforce. In particular, it depicts the influence of culture on international HRM and highlights aspects of people resourcing, training and development, reward and performance management, individual employment relationships, health and well-being. By the end of this chapter, you should be able to: (1) show awareness of the implications of cultural differences and assess their impact on managing people internationally; (2) apply theoretical models of the stages of global organisational development to people resourcing and human resource development (HRD) initiatives; (3) outline the types of training programmes available to international assignees; (4) draw distinctions between the various approaches to rewarding international assignees; (5) outline some individual employment relationship issues of significance in an international environment; and (6) consider individual and family aspects of health and welfare and their importance to business success.

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Abstract

Chapter 22. This chapter draws on all of the others in the book and illustrates the holistic nature of human resource management (HRM), showing how all aspects of domestic HRM are equally applicable when managing an internationally mobile workforce. In particular, it depicts the influence of culture on international HRM and highlights aspects of people resourcing, training and development, reward and performance management, individual employment relationships, health and well-being. By the end of this chapter, you should be able to: (1) show awareness of the implications of cultural differences and assess their impact on managing people internationally; (2) apply theoretical models of the stages of global organisational development to people resourcing and human resource development (HRD) initiatives; (3) outline the types of training programmes available to international assignees; (4) draw distinctions between the various approaches to rewarding international assignees; (5) outline some individual employment relationship issues of significance in an international environment; and (6) consider individual and family aspects of health and welfare and their importance to business success.

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