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Published by: Indiana University
Published in: "Business Horizons", 2006
Length: 12 pages

Abstract

Practitioners and academics continue to note that there is no shortage of inventory in many, if not most, supply chains. Rather, the historical notion holds true: the right product is not in the right place at the right time to meet demand. For positive supply chain performance, it is necessary to re-address inventory''s role and relevance with respect to the development, maintenance, and control of product flows. Suggests that examining such flows from a three-fold perspective can provide a framework to assess efforts to achieve lowest total cost and meet customer service expectations.
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Abstract

Practitioners and academics continue to note that there is no shortage of inventory in many, if not most, supply chains. Rather, the historical notion holds true: the right product is not in the right place at the right time to meet demand. For positive supply chain performance, it is necessary to re-address inventory''s role and relevance with respect to the development, maintenance, and control of product flows. Suggests that examining such flows from a three-fold perspective can provide a framework to assess efforts to achieve lowest total cost and meet customer service expectations.

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