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Management article
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Reference no. F1011F
Authors: Seth Godin
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: "Harvard Business Review - Forethought", 2010
Revision date: 11-Feb-2013
Length: 4 pages

Abstract

Companies that can offer a scarce and coveted good or service that others cannot, will win. Goods and services that are scarce are those that are difficult to conceive, to make, and perhaps at first even to sell. The default for most organizations is to do easy work, such as running a factory, opening a big-box store, making and shipping a product. That used to be the way to grow an organization, but no longer. The only way to avoid the race to the bottom is to create something difficult and valuable, something that people will pay more for. Examples of difficult work include creating things that are tangibly or conceptually beautiful, finding an elegant solution to a problem, and connecting with and leading people.

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Abstract

Companies that can offer a scarce and coveted good or service that others cannot, will win. Goods and services that are scarce are those that are difficult to conceive, to make, and perhaps at first even to sell. The default for most organizations is to do easy work, such as running a factory, opening a big-box store, making and shipping a product. That used to be the way to grow an organization, but no longer. The only way to avoid the race to the bottom is to create something difficult and valuable, something that people will pay more for. Examples of difficult work include creating things that are tangibly or conceptually beautiful, finding an elegant solution to a problem, and connecting with and leading people.

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