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Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: Babson College
Originally published in: 2010
Version: 25 January 2010
Notes: This item is part of a free case collection. For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

In September 2009 Pedro Arriagada Stuven, a member of the Economics and Business Faculty (FEN) at the Universidad del Desarrollo (UDD or University of Development), realized that he was a victim of his own success. Five years earlier, he had proposed to the president of the university that business students should engage directly with the business curriculum by working at a company starting on the first day of school. He called this program the Coops model. It was a great success as shown by the increased number and improved quality of applicants. But rapid growth generated unforeseen challenges like improving the program's administration to cope with more students and more companies. By 2009 Arriagada and his team had to decide how to adjust and consolidate their model. This case presents Pedro as a corporate entrepreneur facing challenges like monitoring students at their work sites, convincing more companies to accept UDD students, and matching companies with students. This case is part of the Babson College free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/babsonfreecases for more information on the collection).

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Abstract

In September 2009 Pedro Arriagada Stuven, a member of the Economics and Business Faculty (FEN) at the Universidad del Desarrollo (UDD or University of Development), realized that he was a victim of his own success. Five years earlier, he had proposed to the president of the university that business students should engage directly with the business curriculum by working at a company starting on the first day of school. He called this program the Coops model. It was a great success as shown by the increased number and improved quality of applicants. But rapid growth generated unforeseen challenges like improving the program's administration to cope with more students and more companies. By 2009 Arriagada and his team had to decide how to adjust and consolidate their model. This case presents Pedro as a corporate entrepreneur facing challenges like monitoring students at their work sites, convincing more companies to accept UDD students, and matching companies with students. This case is part of the Babson College free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/babsonfreecases for more information on the collection).

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