Product details

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Abstract

On 20 April 2010, BP's Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded. Uncontrolled, by 30 May, approximately 20 million gallons of oil had spilled into the Gulf of Mexico. The case places the reader in the role of a fictitious CSR manager at BP, to illustrate challenges of managerial decision making on ethical matters, the role of identity and responsibility, and the constraints resulting from conforming to narrowly framed social and organisational pressures. The case takes place in June 2010 at a time when representatives of the company are being sought out for public comment. Based on the actual events of the oil disaster, students are asked to assume the fictitious role of a CSR manager at BP. Initially, they have to draft a press release about the disaster. This allows undergraduate students to understand theory on identity, and obedience to authority. It helps the class think through managerial ethical action, and decide in a forced-choice framework the appropriate response. This tests their decision making process. It helps post-graduate students in business ethics and corporate social responsibility use normative and descriptive ethical theory. Stakeholder theory is applied to approach the moral dilemmas from the perspective of stakeholders' expectations for corporate responsibility.
Industry:
Size:
Largest global energy MNC, revenue of USD239 (2009), employing 80,000 people in 100 countries
Other setting(s):
June 2010

About

Abstract

On 20 April 2010, BP's Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded. Uncontrolled, by 30 May, approximately 20 million gallons of oil had spilled into the Gulf of Mexico. The case places the reader in the role of a fictitious CSR manager at BP, to illustrate challenges of managerial decision making on ethical matters, the role of identity and responsibility, and the constraints resulting from conforming to narrowly framed social and organisational pressures. The case takes place in June 2010 at a time when representatives of the company are being sought out for public comment. Based on the actual events of the oil disaster, students are asked to assume the fictitious role of a CSR manager at BP. Initially, they have to draft a press release about the disaster. This allows undergraduate students to understand theory on identity, and obedience to authority. It helps the class think through managerial ethical action, and decide in a forced-choice framework the appropriate response. This tests their decision making process. It helps post-graduate students in business ethics and corporate social responsibility use normative and descriptive ethical theory. Stakeholder theory is applied to approach the moral dilemmas from the perspective of stakeholders' expectations for corporate responsibility.

Settings

Industry:
Size:
Largest global energy MNC, revenue of USD239 (2009), employing 80,000 people in 100 countries
Other setting(s):
June 2010

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