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Abstract

Branding of a charity could present new challenges other than those encountered in branding exercises by for-profit organisations. This case discusses how a corporate communications exercise evolved into a broader branding exercise that took Singapore Children''s Society (SCS) on an internal organisational change process that included the reframing and articulation of its values, role and profile in the charity sector in Singapore. For the charity, the ''branding'' process was often not clear-cut or particularly systematic, as it dealt with staff understanding and perceptions about the branding initiative. The process was ad-hoc and reactive, as the charity''s leaders and staff responded to changing demands in their environment. For SCS, success in branding also meant that it would have to confront questions from its multiple stakeholders regarding the effectiveness and impact of their programmes. Whilst successful branding could increase the level of stakeholders'' support, it also raised their expectations regarding what the charity can or should do. For the leadership and management, this implied a need to link SCS''s mission to intended impacts and to continually fine-tune programmes and activities to achieve this.
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2002-2009

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Abstract

Branding of a charity could present new challenges other than those encountered in branding exercises by for-profit organisations. This case discusses how a corporate communications exercise evolved into a broader branding exercise that took Singapore Children''s Society (SCS) on an internal organisational change process that included the reframing and articulation of its values, role and profile in the charity sector in Singapore. For the charity, the ''branding'' process was often not clear-cut or particularly systematic, as it dealt with staff understanding and perceptions about the branding initiative. The process was ad-hoc and reactive, as the charity''s leaders and staff responded to changing demands in their environment. For SCS, success in branding also meant that it would have to confront questions from its multiple stakeholders regarding the effectiveness and impact of their programmes. Whilst successful branding could increase the level of stakeholders'' support, it also raised their expectations regarding what the charity can or should do. For the leadership and management, this implied a need to link SCS''s mission to intended impacts and to continually fine-tune programmes and activities to achieve this.

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Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2002-2009

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