Product details

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Published by: Darden Business Publishing
Published in: 2004
Length: 22 pages

Abstract

In December 2001, Comcast won the auction to acquire AT&T Broadband. The $72 billion winning bid would combine Comcast, the third largest cable operator, with the industry leader. Comcast Corp. President Roberts and Comcast Cable President Steve Burke had to now consider post-merger integration strategies. This is a good case to examine (1) how government legislation can affect the competitive dynamics of an industry, (2) the difficulties companies face in integrating senior management teams with different management styles and companies with different cultures, (3) integrating complementary products with low opportunity to cross-sell and achieve cost savings, (4) establishing ''success metrics'' for a defensive acquisition, and (5) understanding how integration activities can send signals across a corporation.

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Abstract

In December 2001, Comcast won the auction to acquire AT&T Broadband. The $72 billion winning bid would combine Comcast, the third largest cable operator, with the industry leader. Comcast Corp. President Roberts and Comcast Cable President Steve Burke had to now consider post-merger integration strategies. This is a good case to examine (1) how government legislation can affect the competitive dynamics of an industry, (2) the difficulties companies face in integrating senior management teams with different management styles and companies with different cultures, (3) integrating complementary products with low opportunity to cross-sell and achieve cost savings, (4) establishing ''success metrics'' for a defensive acquisition, and (5) understanding how integration activities can send signals across a corporation.

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