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Published by: SDA Bocconi
Originally published in: 2008
Version: October 2008
Length: 6 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This supplement is to accompany the case ''609-037-1''. The abstract of the case is as follows: The case discusses the application of operations management techniques to health care services, with a particular focus on patient flow logistics. In 2003, Boston Medical Center was facing different operational problems, such as Emergency Department overcrowding and diversions, elective surgical cases cancelled or postponed, patients treated in inappropriate hospital settings, stressful working conditions especially for nurses (many hours of over-time, over work, high unpredictability and variability, long shifts). In order to solve these problems, the chief medical officer, defined three different possible areas for intervention: (1) optimise the management of urgent / emergency cases; (2) re-organise the entire OR scheduling process; and (3) improve the patient flow within the hospital. Students are asked to evaluate these operational strategies using some fundamental operations management tools and frameworks such as: (1) process analysis; (2) variability methodology; (3) logistics; (4) patient flows; (5) capacity analysis and planning and (6) queuing theory.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
623-beds teaching hospital
Other setting(s):
2003

About

Abstract

This supplement is to accompany the case ''609-037-1''. The abstract of the case is as follows: The case discusses the application of operations management techniques to health care services, with a particular focus on patient flow logistics. In 2003, Boston Medical Center was facing different operational problems, such as Emergency Department overcrowding and diversions, elective surgical cases cancelled or postponed, patients treated in inappropriate hospital settings, stressful working conditions especially for nurses (many hours of over-time, over work, high unpredictability and variability, long shifts). In order to solve these problems, the chief medical officer, defined three different possible areas for intervention: (1) optimise the management of urgent / emergency cases; (2) re-organise the entire OR scheduling process; and (3) improve the patient flow within the hospital. Students are asked to evaluate these operational strategies using some fundamental operations management tools and frameworks such as: (1) process analysis; (2) variability methodology; (3) logistics; (4) patient flows; (5) capacity analysis and planning and (6) queuing theory.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
623-beds teaching hospital
Other setting(s):
2003

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