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Management article
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Reference no. 96311
Authors: Karl E. Weick
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1996
Length: 4 pages

Abstract

Increasingly, work in today''s corporations unfolds in small, temporary groups where the stakes are high, turnover is chronic, foul-ups can spread, and the unexpected is common. Karl E. Weick finds lessons for senior managers watching over such groups in an unusual source: Norman Maclean''s 1992 book, Young Men and Fire, which reconstructs the circumstances of a deadly fire in Montana''s Mann Gulch that claimed the lives of 13 young men. The author believes that corporate leaders can learn from this example by developing groups capable of improvisation, wise behavior, respectful interaction, and communication.

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Abstract

Increasingly, work in today''s corporations unfolds in small, temporary groups where the stakes are high, turnover is chronic, foul-ups can spread, and the unexpected is common. Karl E. Weick finds lessons for senior managers watching over such groups in an unusual source: Norman Maclean''s 1992 book, Young Men and Fire, which reconstructs the circumstances of a deadly fire in Montana''s Mann Gulch that claimed the lives of 13 young men. The author believes that corporate leaders can learn from this example by developing groups capable of improvisation, wise behavior, respectful interaction, and communication.

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